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police  // Browsing posts in police

Billerica Police, Greg Katz, law enforcement, Nextdoor, police, SM Use, social media | Comments Off on Nextdoor Rollout, Two Months In

Nextdoor Rollout, Two Months In

This post is a follow up to my original story, Nextdoor: Social Media For The Neighborhood.  If you’re not up to speed on Nextdoor go ahead and read that original post first. It’s been about two months (as I write this) since my department launched Nextdoor and there’s been some progress in a number of areas to report back on. Adoption and membership Back at the end of August 2013 we had been recruiting founding members and putting the word out via our traditional forms of social media, specifically Twitter and Facebook.  I emphasize this because I do think we would have had a much slower adoption rate without the significant audience we already had in place on those platforms. On launch day we were approaching 600 Nextdoor members.  Today is November 3, 2013 and we now have just over 2400 members representing 37 neighborhoods for a total of 12% of households.  When looking at individual neighborhoods the numbers range from a low of 4% of households up to 43% on the high end.  The largest membership in one of our biggest neighborhoods is 210.  Every area of town is represented and every neighborhood has launched permanently.  Here’s how our map...

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Who’s SMILE’n in Omaha

With two weeks until the next SMILE Conference® in Omaha, this is a list of the police agencies and companies sending at least one person to the conference. The SMILE Conference is hosted by Chief Todd Schmaderer and the men and women of the Omaha Police Department. Our keynotes include Deputy Chief Peter Sloly of Toronto Police and Commissioner Peter Muyshondt of the Belgian Police. Our second day will focus on event management from floods to viral videos to line of duty deaths and our third day features presentations from all three of our finalists in the Social Media Investigator category of the ConnectedCOPS Awards. We will also explore social media monitoring, engagement, strategy and reputation management. There’s still time to register. Get a discount code from any of our exhibitors or LawOfficer.com. Airbnb, Inc., CA Arcadia Police Department, CA Arlington PD, TX Atlanta Police Department, GA Aurora Police Department, NE BAIR Analytics Inc. Barrie Police Service, ON Belgian Local Police, Belgium Bellevue Police Department, NE Bismarck Police Department, ND Bismarck, ND, City of Borders Limited, Nigeria Boston College Police Department, MA BrightPlanet, SD Calgary Police Service, AB Cape Coral Police Department, FL CES PRISM Cobourg Police Service, ON Crime...

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Facebook, law enforcement, police, Russell Webster, selfies, SM Use, social media, Twitter, York Regional Police | Comments Off on When Selfie Stands for Self-Incrimination

When Selfie Stands for Self-Incrimination

Celebs do them, teenage girls do them, even educated fleas do them. Selfies – digital self-portraits which are then posted online – are all over the internet. The advent of Vine has provided yet another outlet for the self-obsessed to add to the usual suspects of Twitter, Facebook, Instagram & YouTube. This post gives a couple of examples of how self-obsession by criminals can cause more than social embarrassment. Online drug dealing is not as simple as it seems Our first story concerns a young Canadian mechanic who has obviously read about the Silk Road and how easy it is to buy drugs online. However, rather than worrying about bitcoins and Tor encryption, he went straight to Twitter requesting drug dealers to make a delivery to the garage where he was working – only to find that the local police were smart enough to be scanning local social media:     The police then went one stop further and re-tweeted the original to the garage owner:   @JTreliving FYI – MT @Sunith_DB8R Any dealers in Vaughan wanna make a 20sac chop? Come to Keele/Langstaff Mr. Lube, need a spliff. — York Regional Police (@YRP) August 13, 2013   Twitter of...

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Billerica Police, Greg Katz, law enforcement, Media, Mobile Apps, Nextdoor, police, SM Tools, social media | Comments Off on Nextdoor: Social Media For The Neighborhood

Nextdoor: Social Media For The Neighborhood

The private social network for your neighborhood. That’s how Nextdoor, a two year old startup company based in San Francisco, describes their product. What is it? What does it do? Who is it for? How much is it? Let’s back up a moment and I will answer all of those questions. My Department’s community has really embraced our efforts with social media (Twitter and Facebook). We have a strong following on both platforms and the overall feedback from residents has been overwhelmingly positive. Any Law Enforcement agency that makes a strong effort with social media won’t have to wait long before discovering its benefits. You’ll also wonder why you waited so long to embrace it. And, yes, you will quickly learn its pitfalls and limitations as well. It can often be a trial and error process which can sometimes raise the blood pressure of management and line Officers. If you’ve been a ConnectedCOP you already know this and you also realize the benefits outweigh the risks. A lot of these topics have been covered quite extensively and I’m not going to rehash most of it in this post. I am going to speak of limitations with traditional social media and...

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law enforcement, Pinterest, police, Roger Nield, SM Tools, SM Use, social media, Surrey Police | Comments Off on Surrey police use Pinterest to return stolen property to victims of crime

Surrey police use Pinterest to return stolen property to victims of crime

In June 2013 Victoria Hunter, a Detective with Surrey Police executed a search warrant at the home of a burglar and recovered a large quantity of watches and jewellery. Having checked the stolen property records she realised that it would be very difficult to re-connect what might have been stolen with the owners. Some property was poorly described on the crime reports. It was made more difficult because the area where the offences had taken place crossed police force boundaries. So there were some items that apparently were not recorded as stolen goods. This scenario will be recognised by every operational police officer wherever they work. In discussing the situation back in the office a (Civilian) Team Co-ordinator Dawn Lewis mentioned Pinterest the ‘pinboard-style’ photograph sharing social media website and the hypothesis was posed, “Why don’t we post images of the recovered items on a specific Pinterest page and invite victims of crimes to identify what, if anything is theirs?” As we know “a picture says a thousand words”. So whilst Vic liaised with the intelligence unit and searched for all the offences that were committed with the subject’s particular style (MO) other colleagues from the team rallied around and...

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Capr Coral Police, Cold Cases, ConnectedCOPS Awards, law enforcement, police, Reyjavik Police, Saanich Police, SM Use, social media, social media strategy | Comments Off on ConnectedCOPS Awards 2013: Finalists for Excellence at a Large Agency

ConnectedCOPS Awards 2013: Finalists for Excellence at a Large Agency

ConnectedCOPS Excellence at a Large Agency This award is given to a law enforcement agency, anywhere in the world, of 151 sworn officers or more that has demonstrated overall excellence in the use of social media to enhance its services to the public. The agency exhibits leadership, creativity and innovation in its use of social media to engage, educate, recruit, and etc. The agency has a broad and deep understanding of social media use and applies sound governance and strategy in its social media operations. The agency also promotes the use of social networking in law enforcement through its outreach to colleagues and by mentoring others. We have three finalists and they are: Reykjavik Police, Iceland Since it was founded in 2007 the Reykjavik Metropolitan Police (RMP) has worked to enhance the security and feeling of security among those who live, work or stay in the metropolitan area. To achieve this objective the RMP has focused on increasing the visibility of the police, increased information sharing and building a proactive community partnership. The RMP tapped social media at the end of 2010 and is rapidly accomplishing these goals as a result. With over 42,000 Facebook subscribers the RMP is connected...

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Boston Police, Calgary Police, ConnectedCOPS Awards, Facebook, law enforcement, police, SM Use, SMILE, social media, social media strategy, Twitter | Comments Off on ConnectedCOPS Awards 2013: Finalists for Social Media Event Management

ConnectedCOPS Awards 2013: Finalists for Social Media Event Management

ConnectedCOPS Social Media Event Management This award is given to the law enforcement agency anywhere in the world who has used social media to manage and/or influence a public safety/emergency event, whether unforeseen or known. This agency has strategically and successfully implemented social media engagement techniques to positively and effectively communicate public safety information in an urgent or emergency situation. The finalists in the Social Media in Event Management category have done extraordinary work managing emergency events. The judges were very impressed with the quality of nominations in this category. There are two finalists in this category: Calgary Police, Canada When the greatest disaster in the city’s history hit Calgary, the media went quiet and so did City websites and social media accounts. That’s when the Calgary Police Service stepped up. In an attempt to communicate during the crisis, CPS put out numerous updates on Twitter and Facebook, as well as responding to many of the over 22,000 mentions between June 20–24. When a City of Calgary website housing evacuation maps went dark, CPS took those same maps and posted them on their Flickr account, answering the questions of many confused Calgarians. On the Service’s official YouTube account, an hour-long...

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Burglars, Linda Nagelhout, police, Research, SM Use, social media | Comments Off on Burglars do not use social media!

Burglars do not use social media!

Editor’s note: Previously on this blog we posted and infographic titled “How burglars use social media”. On the heels of that posting came this infographic as a result of research done in The Netherlands suggesting just the opposite. ‘Don’t advertise that you are away. Social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter can be a risk if people know you are away and your home is empty’. This is a frequently repeated message. Taking precautions is reasonable but why make such a fuss about it when there is none scientific proof that burglars do use social media? This research makes clear that it appears to be quite difficult to use social media in regard to finding a suitable home/target for burglars. The research states that 77% of the social media-users protects their online information. Because of all the well protected information, burglars find it difficult to find useful information and even more so to use this information to actually steal something. In addition, an experiment in which two groups of cops (in training) were playing the part of burglars, makes clear that compared to the ‘old fashioned way’ (scouring the streets), social media is not lucrative. The ‘burglars’ in the control...

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ConnectedCOPS Awards, Eric Draeger, Jeff Bangild, law enforcement, Milwaukee Police, Phoenix Police, police, Sam Palmer, SM Use, SMILE, social media, Toronto Police | Comments Off on ConnectedCOPS Awards 2013: Finalists for Social Media Investigator

ConnectedCOPS Awards 2013: Finalists for Social Media Investigator

The ConnectedCOPS Social Media Investigator Award is generously sponsored by LexisNexis. The finalists in this category are doing extraordinary work with open source investigations. They demonstrate a consistent, methodical, persistent and high quality approach. The judges were very impressed with the quality of nominations in this category. Mary Craige is the Marketing Manager for LexisNexis’ Law Enforcement Division. She said “This year’s nominees for the ConnectedCOPS Top Social Media Investigator illustrate the importance of law enforcement’s ability to find, mine and analyze activity in social media. All of these nominees show their understanding of the medium and their ability to adapt their investigations to how the social media landscape is changing.” ConnectedCOPS Social Media Investigator This award is given to the sworn law enforcement investigator at any worldwide law enforcement agency who, as a practitioner, has used social media successfully to solve crime. The Social Media Investigator practices appropriate security measures and supervision in his/her investigations.  The three finalists are: Jeff Bangild Detective Bangild works for the Toronto Police Service. He is highly respected for his work involving the Internet and social media especially in cases of criminal harassment. Bangild has made ground breaking headway in obtaining reasonable and probable...

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law enforcement, police, Russell Webster, SM Use, social media, Storify, Twitter | Comments Off on How do we overcome Twitter abuse?

How do we overcome Twitter abuse?

These sorts of vile attacks are horribly commonplace The story of how hundreds of men mounted a sustained online attack on Caroline Criado-Perez, threatening her with rape and violent assault in reaction to her successful campaign to get the face of Jane Austen on British £10 bank notes has caused public outrage. Perhaps the most shocking aspect of the story is how commonplace this sort of vile attack is. Most women Tweeters with any sort of public profile have experienced unprovoked online assaults. The vast majority of us want to see a fast, reliable way of the perpetrators of this sort of abuse facing the consequences of their actions. But none of us has yet come up with an effective response. There are too many of these cases to expect the police to prioritise online investigations. In the same way, Twitter would have to change fundamentally (not allow anonymity or charge hefty membership rates) if it took over the role of policing itself. Similarly, although Tweeters will usually support others under-fire, the fact that this sort of perpetrator can swiftly set up numerous anonymous accounts makes that form of action ineffective. Tweeters who are targeted can of course block offenders,...

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